New AFL-CIO leader eyeing tech sector for organizing

Liz Shuler, the new leader of the nation’s greatest federation of labor unions, the AFL-CIO, stated in an job interview posted Sunday that she is eyeing the tech sector for arranging attempts amid shifts in the U.S. workforce.

Shuler spoke to Axios alongside with Fred Redmond, AFL-CIO’s initial Black secretary-treasurer, forward of her affirmation as president at the group’s constitutional conference. She has been managing the firm because longtime leader Richard Trumka’s demise final summertime.

The two described the recent union votes at Amazon and Starbucks, but declined to say which tech corporations have been in their sights.

“It’s our moment to write the following chapter of the labor motion,” she added. “We are searching to seize on this minute to present that the labor motion is vast open up — that we are open to transformational alter.” 

Both equally leaders stated focusing on workers in the tech field was element of broader attempts to establish much more variety inside of the labor movement.

“The rising workforce is men and women of colour, is younger people, is women, notably girls of color,” Shuler advised Axios. “This is not your granddaddy’s labor motion.”

The labor motion has noticed a resurgence as the overall economy recovers from the pandemic, with personnel emboldened by a restricted labor current market. President Biden has also promised to be “the most pro-union president in American history.”

Responding to polls last yr displaying that Americans’ view of labor unions is at a 60-year superior, Schuler stated the knowledge “should mail a obvious concept to Congress that union employment are essential as we re-emerge from this pandemic with a much better overall economy that is built upon the concepts of fairness and equality.”

The AFL-CIO has been a primary voice in the force for the Pro Act, a pro-labor deal that would reinforce the skill for unions to organize and collectively bargain.

Having said that, even with aid from Biden and quite a few Democrats, the bill has designed minimal progress in the Senate.

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